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Homosexuality

This post is the last in what has been a continuing series for the month of March that aimed to examine the American Church’s response to homosexuals in their midst, whether they be believers, agnostics, or atheists. This month’s series was spawned by the Harding University Queer Press publishing a zine on March 2 featuring the voices and stories of past and present LGBTQ students at Harding University in Searcy, Arkansas, my alma mater. The zine can be downloaded in its digital entirety at http://www.huqueerpress.com.

One of my favorite verses in the Bible is Proverbs 3:27-28, and it says, “Do not withhold good from those who deserve it, when it is in your power to act. Do not say to your neighbor, ‘Come back later; I’ll give it tomorrow’—when you now have it with you.” Read More

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This post is one in a continuing series for the month of March that aims to examine the American Church’s response to homosexuals in their midst, whether they be believers, agnostics, or atheists. This month’s series was spawned by the Harding University Queer Press publishing a zine on March 2 featuring the voices and stories of past and present LGBTQ students at Harding University in Searcy, Arkansas, my alma mater. The zine can be downloaded in its digital entirety at http://www.huqueerpress.com.

One thing I noticed the blogosphere really gravitated towards after the zine came out was a collective confusion over, “Why would anyone who’s gay want to go to Harding?” Several former students responded on comment boards and noted that some kids—gay and straight alike—have parents who dangle the following ultimatum over their heads: “We won’t pay for college unless you go to a Christian school,” or some will even go as far to say, “We won’t pay for college unless it’s Harding.” Read More

This post is one in a continuing series for the month of March that aims to examine the American Church’s response to homosexuals in their midst, whether they be believers, agnostics, or atheists. This month’s series was spawned by the Harding University Queer Press publishing a zine on March 2 featuring the voices and stories of past and present LGBTQ students at Harding University in Searcy, Arkansas, my alma mater. The zine can be downloaded in its digital entirety at http://www.huqueerpress.com.

A lot of the blogosphere and its commenters during this whole zine event have been pretty insensitive in their speech, which isn’t all that surprising since the internet affords people the opportunity to be anonymous and say whatever they want to without having to stake their claim with their name and, thus, maintain any sort of ownership on their opinion. I had always assumed, though, if people had their name attached to their comment they would think twice before speaking (or typing, I suppose). And actually, I do still think that’s usually the case, which is why the following situation was so disturbing; some people surprisingly are not afraid to publicly proclaim how they really feel about this issue of homosexuality, even if the end result is them looking seethingly spiteful. Read More